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Environmental & Ecology

Environmental & Ecology

Injection of bacteria could stop dengue fever

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Australian scientists have discovered a cheap and effective method of preventing the transmission of dengue fever, which kills more than 12000 people a year. The researchers showed how female mosquitoes infected with the Wolbachia bacteria passed the bug easily to their offspring, making them all dengue-free. They believe that such infected mosquitoes should be released into the wild, so that the spread of dengue to people may be reduced. In their experiment, the scientists injected the bacteria into more than 2,500 embryos of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that can spread dengue fever. After they hatched, they were treated to blood meals laced with the dengue virus, and none picked up the virus.

Explosion at nuclear waste plant

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A fatal explosion took place at the Marcoule nuclear reprocessing plant in southern France. The explosion took place at the Centraco nuclear waste treatment centre, which belongs to Socodei, a subsidiary of the energy giant EDF. Marcoule, in the southern Gard region, is a major nuclear site. Its three reactors have been decommissioned. It is currently a base for reprocessing nuclear waste. The site is involved in the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and operates a pressurized water reactor used to produce tritium. The site at which the explosion took place is partly used by French nuclear giant Areva to produce mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, which recycles plutonium from nuclear weapons.

About Mixed Oxide Fuel: Mixed oxide fuel (MOX) fuel, is nuclear fuel that contains more than one oxide of fissile material. MOX fuel contains plutonium blended with natural uranium, reprocessed uranium,

New ‘Wind Made’

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Label Identifies Products Made with Wind Power The growing hunger for more sustainable products took a unique path when some of world’s leading companies and non-profit organisations supported the development of the first global consumer label identifying products made with wind energy. This was announced by the Secretary General of the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) Steve